Anger Management – Environmental Change

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Environmental Change

Sometimes it’s your immediate circumstances that prompt angry feelings. Problems and responsibilities can weigh on you and make you angry at the trap you seem to have fallen into — and all the people and things that form that trap.

Take road rage, for example. If driving makes you furious, research suggests, you’re putting yourself and others at risk. Angry drivers are more aggressive, take more chances, and report more accidents and near-misses than their more relaxed counterparts. If your commute leaves you frustrated or enraged, perhaps you could find a less congested or more scenic route. Or investigate alternative options, such as taking a bus or train. Finding alternatives can ease your anger, making the road safer for everyone.

Try these other tips for easing up:

  • Give yourself a break. Make sure to schedule some personal time during especially stressful parts of the day. You might have a rule that the first 15 minutes after coming home from work will be quiet time, for example. With this brief respite, you’ll feel better prepared to handle demands from your kids without blowing up.

  • Consider the timing. If you and your spouse tend to fight at night, perhaps it’s because you’re tired, distracted, or just accustomed to fighting then. Try changing the times when you talk about important matters so these talks don’t turn into arguments.

  • Avoid what you can. If you get furious when you walk by your child’s messy room, shut the door. Don’t make yourself look at what infuriates you. And don’t tell yourself your child should clean up so you won’t have to be angry. That’s not the point: The point is to keep yourself calm.

Credit: American Psychological Association

See more: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/controlling-anger.aspx